Incoherent Ramblings

Aug 10

nebulasnovasandnightsky:

look if you unironically say ‘money can’t buy happiness’ then either you’ve never faced a real financial struggle or you’ve achieved enlightenment, because goddamn does financial security feel an awful lot like happiness when it’s something you’re not used to

(via msdistress)


Jul 3
wefuckinglovescience:

A two inch frog shelters itself from the rain in Jember, East Java, in Indonesia.


  Image by Penkdix Palme

wefuckinglovescience:

A two inch frog shelters itself from the rain in Jember, East Java, in Indonesia.


Image by Penkdix Palme

readingwithavengeance:

Things that make for a good cliffhanger:

  • Defeating the badguy and then realizing there’s another badguy
  • Rescuing the kidnapped prince but realizing the badguy got away
  • Solving the McGuffin puzzle and then finding out there’s two more
  • Fighting in the final battle, losing, and having to regroup for next book
  • A dramatic reveal on the final page that puts a downer on the celebration party

Things that are NOT a cliffhanger:

  • An entire book of set-up and backstory and more set-up and did we mention set-up and then NOT EVEN A SMIDGEON OF PAYOFF OR CONCLUSION

Stop selling me half a book and then calling it a ‘cliffhanger.’

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)



Jun 27

thetomska:

swinku:

Finally did a proper comic about “strong female characters” Its good comics and cartoons are finally representing some diversity. But most cartoons are still with a male lead, and films mostly are the worst example of strong females etc. (Although sarcastic mean girls are a special love of mine provided they are at least sort of decently written)

ALSO please note I am using examples based on stuff I like, its hardly the end all be all of character examples. There is a ton of current and not current stuff I could have used. But an excuse to draw characters I like is aesthetic and preference. (also I really liked Pacific rim so theres that.)

I personally thought Pacific Rim had exceptionally two dimensional characters but this comic is something worth learning from.

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)


Jun 26

frickingirish:

good fan fics that not enough people read 

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not so good fan fics that have millions of read and 100 fan trailers, ship tag, fic tag, manips, fan accounts…

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rumaan: #i have seen this so many times#some of the popular dramione fics leave me squinting at them trying to see the appeal#no i’m not going to name them
It’s ok bb. You can name me. ;P

(via rumaan)


Jun 24
“Bad books on writing tell you to ‘WRITE WHAT YOU KNOW’, a solemn and totally false adage that is the reason there exist so many mediocre novels about English professors contemplating adultery.”

Joe Haldeman (via maxkirin)

Just choked on my fucking drink

(via thingsididntknowwereerotic)

(via greenberetgirl)


accountingbros:

aliasofwestgate:

justira:

Reblogging not just because special effects are cool but because body doubles, stunt doubles, acting doubles, talent doubles — all the people whose faces we’re not supposed to see but whose bodies make movies and tv shows possible — these people need and deserve more recognition. We see their bodies onscreen, delight in the shape and motion of those bodies, but even as we pick apart everything else that goes on both on and behind the screen, I just don’t see the people who are those bodies getting the love and recognition they deserve.

We’re coming to love and recognize actors who work in full-body makeup/costumes, such as Andy Serkis, or actors whose entire performances, or large chunks thereof, are motion captured or digitized (lately sometimes also Andy Serkis!). But people like Leander Deeny play an enormous part in making characters such as Steve Rogers come to life, too. Body language is a huge part of a performance and of characterization. For characters/series with a lot of action, a stunt person can have a huge influence on how we read and interpret a character, such as the influence Heidi Moneymaker has had on the style and choreography of Black Widow’s signature fighting style. Talent doubles breathe believability and discipline-specific nuance into demanding storylines.

Actors are creative people themselves, and incredibly important in building the characters we see onscreen. But if we agree that they’re more than dancing monkeys who just do whatever the directors/writers say, then we have to agree that doubles are more than that, too. Doubles make creative decisions too, and often form strong, mutually supportive relationship with actors.

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Image 1: “I would like to thank Kathryn Alexandre, the most generous actor I’ve ever worked opposite.”

Image 2: “Kathryn who’s playing my double who’s incredible.”

[ Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany on her acting double, Kathryn Alexandre, two images from a set on themarysue, via lifeofkj ]

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I’ve got a relationship that goes back many, many years with Dave. And I would hate for people to just see that image of me and Dave and go, “oh, there’s Dan Radcliffe with a person in a wheelchair.” Because I would never even for a moment want them to assume that Dave was anything except for an incredibly important person in my life.

[ Daniel Radcliffe talking about David Holmes, his stunt double for 2001-2009, who was paralysed while working on the Harry Potter films. David Holmes relates his story here. Gifset via smeagoled ]

With modern tv- and film-making techniques, many characters are composite creations. The characters we see onscreen or onstage have always been team efforts, with writers, directors, makeup artists, costume designers, special effects artists, production designers, and many other people all contributing to how a character is ultimately realized in front of us. Many different techniques go into something like the creation of Skinny Steve — he’s no more all Leander Deeny than he is all Chris Evans.

But as fandom dissects the anatomy of scenes in ever-increasing detail to get at microexpressions and the minutiae of body language, let’s recognize the anatomy in the scenes, too. I don’t mean to take away from the work Chris Evans or any other actors do (he is an amazing Steve Rogers and I love him tons), but fandom needs to do better in recognizing the bodies, the other people, who make up the characters we love and some of our very favourite shots of them. Chris Evans has an amazing body, but so does Leander Deeny — that body is beautiful; that body mimicked Chris Evans’s motions with amazing, skilled precision; that body moved Steve Rogers with emotion and grace and character.

Fandom should do better than productions and creators who fail to be transparent about the doubles in their productions. On the screen, suspension of disbelief is key and the goal is to make all the effort that went into the production vanish and leave only the product itself behind. But when the film is over and the episode ends, let’s remember everyone who helped make that happen.

image

[ Sam Hargrave (stunt double for Chris Evans) and James Young (stunt double for Sebastian Stan, and fight choreographer), seen from behind, exchange a fistbump while in costume on the set of Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Image via lifeofkj ]

I applaud these guys as much as the suit actors in my japanese tokusatsu shows. They do just as much work. 

Let us not forget voice doubles, but yes to all this, being a double is hard work and you are at your best if no one can tell the difference between you and the actor.

(via greenberetgirl)


hellotailor:

but srsly tho.

(via msdistress)


Jun 22

shittyflowergirl:

could everyone please stop making dramione fanfics where Draco is smarter than Hermione? thank you

Depends. Hermione has book smarts, certainly, but I always found that she had a bit of a blind spot when it came to things that couldn’t be found in books…

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